The Wave Function Tumblr

Where my obsessions collide.

7,089 notes

I’ve never been female. But I have been black my whole life. I can perhaps offer some insight from that perspective. There are many similar social issues related to access to equal opportunity that we find in the black community, as well as the community of women in a white male dominate society…

When I look at — throughout my life — I’ve known that I wanted to do astrophysics since I was 9 years old…I got to see how the world around me reacted to my expressions of these ambitions. All I can say is, the fact that I wanted to be a scientist, an astrophysicist was hands down the path of most resistance through the forces of society.

Anytime I expressed this interest, teachers would say, ‘Oh, don’t you wanna be an athlete?’ I want to become someone that was outside of the paradigm of expectations of the people in power. Fortunately, my depth of interest of the universe was so deep and so fuel enriched that everyone of these curve balls that I was thrown, and fences built in front of me, and hills that I had to climb, I just reach for more fuel, and I just kept going.

Now, here I am, one of the most visible scientists in the land, and I wanna look behind me and say, ‘Where are the others who might have been this,’ and they’re not there! …I happened to survive and others did not simply because of forces of society that prevented it at every turn. At every turn.

…My life experience tells me that when you don’t find blacks, when you don’t find women in the sciences, I know that these forces are real, and I had to survive them in order to get where I am today.

So before we start talking about genetic differences, you gotta come up with a system where there’s equal opportunity, then we can have that conversation.

Neil DeGrasse Tyson in response to a question posed by Lawrence Summers, former Treasury Security and Harvard University President

"What’s up with chicks and science?"

"Are there genetic differences between men and women? Explain why more men are in science."

(via we-are-star-stuff)

(Source: magnius159, via we-are-star-stuff)

Filed under neil degrasse tyson sexism racism discrimination science society

4,045 notes

I twittered about this earlier, but sometimes it feels as though talking about misogyny in this industry is like dealing with Groundhog Day: there seems to be a continuous reset, a collective male amnesia around the issue. As if, when a woman speaks out, it’s for the first time and everyone is shocked. Just shocked, I tell you. Sexism exists? OH MY GOD.
Veteran writer Marjorie Liu on sexual harassment/misogny in the comics industry—and the collective amnesia that hits much of the industry every time the topic ever gets broached. (via robot6)

(via 70s--postmiserablism)

Filed under marjorie liu sexism feminism hollywood

41 notes

dedalvs:

fuckyeahmylanguage:

That awkward moment when you lose a heart on duolingo not because you don’t understand the target language, but because you don’t know how to properly conjugate the present perfect of a verb in your native language.

And Linguo help you if you get either lie or lay in any tense!

I think it’s weird that people have an aversion to using the word “drunk” as a past participle.  You have sets like sing/sang/sung and sink/sank/sunk, so the pattern is established.  But nobody seems to use it for drink.But whenever people put themselves in the position of having to turn drink into a participle, I usually hear them go with “drank.”  Sometimes they act confused, like they know “drank” sounds weird but they can’t imagine what goes in its place.  It’s like, the fact that “drunk” is an adjective makes them discount it as a participle, even though virtually all past participles in English can function as adjectives.  People say “I’m sunk” when the jig is up, but that doesn’t lead them to say things like “the boat has sank.”

dedalvs:

fuckyeahmylanguage:

That awkward moment when you lose a heart on duolingo not because you don’t understand the target language, but because you don’t know how to properly conjugate the present perfect of a verb in your native language.

And Linguo help you if you get either lie or lay in any tense!

I think it’s weird that people have an aversion to using the word “drunk” as a past participle. You have sets like sing/sang/sung and sink/sank/sunk, so the pattern is established. But nobody seems to use it for drink.

But whenever people put themselves in the position of having to turn drink into a participle, I usually hear them go with “drank.” Sometimes they act confused, like they know “drank” sounds weird but they can’t imagine what goes in its place. It’s like, the fact that “drunk” is an adjective makes them discount it as a participle, even though virtually all past participles in English can function as adjectives.

People say “I’m sunk” when the jig is up, but that doesn’t lead them to say things like “the boat has sank.”

Filed under language verbs irregular verbs drinking english drunk