The Wave Function Tumblr

Where my obsessions collide.

8 notes

kittensandscience:

I keep going back and forth between “birds are dinosaurs” and “yeah, technically they’re dinosaurs, from a cladistic perspective, but that’s really pedantic”

Like, yeah, they’re obviously in the dinosaur clade, but paraphylic names do have a place.  Otherwise you’d have to call birds “reptiles”, too, and all land vertebrates would have to be called fish!

Yeah, but referring to birds as dinosaurs means never having to admit that dinosaurs are extinct!

Filed under science science! birds dinosaurs cladistics classification

65,380 notes

I began to realize how important it was to be an enthusiast in life. If you are interested in something, no matter what it is, go at it full speed ahead. Embrace it with both arms, hug it, love it and above all become passionate about it. Lukewarm is no good.
Roald Dahl   (via fuckinq)

I’m going to re-read some Roald Dahl this year. The library at school practically has the complete works.

(Source: onlinecounsellingcollege, via heliumraven)

Filed under roald dahl enthusiasm

10,200 notes

generalelectric:

“We have a hunger of the mind which asks for knowledge of all around us, and the more we gain, the more is our desire; the more we see, the more we are capable of seeing.” 
Maria Mitchell is known as the first professional female astronomer in the United States. On October 1, 1847, she peered through her family’s telescope and “swept around for comets,” as she did every night it was clear. But that night she became the first woman in the U.S. to discover one. She later became the first Astronomy professor at Vassar College, where she would often ask her students, “Did you learn that in a book or observe it yourself?” 

generalelectric:

“We have a hunger of the mind which asks for knowledge of all around us, and the more we gain, the more is our desire; the more we see, the more we are capable of seeing.” 

Maria Mitchell is known as the first professional female astronomer in the United States. On October 1, 1847, she peered through her family’s telescope and “swept around for comets,” as she did every night it was clear. But that night she became the first woman in the U.S. to discover one. She later became the first Astronomy professor at Vassar College, where she would often ask her students, “Did you learn that in a book or observe it yourself?” 

(Source: aps.org, via offbynone)

Filed under maria mitchell astronomy history science comets education

13,450 notes

I’ve never been female. But I have been black my whole life. I can perhaps offer some insight from that perspective. There are many similar social issues related to access to equal opportunity that we find in the black community, as well as the community of women in a white male dominate society…

When I look at — throughout my life — I’ve known that I wanted to do astrophysics since I was 9 years old…I got to see how the world around me reacted to my expressions of these ambitions. All I can say is, the fact that I wanted to be a scientist, an astrophysicist was hands down the path of most resistance through the forces of society.

Anytime I expressed this interest, teachers would say, ‘Oh, don’t you wanna be an athlete?’ I want to become someone that was outside of the paradigm of expectations of the people in power. Fortunately, my depth of interest of the universe was so deep and so fuel enriched that everyone of these curve balls that I was thrown, and fences built in front of me, and hills that I had to climb, I just reach for more fuel, and I just kept going.

Now, here I am, one of the most visible scientists in the land, and I wanna look behind me and say, ‘Where are the others who might have been this,’ and they’re not there! …I happened to survive and others did not simply because of forces of society that prevented it at every turn. At every turn.

…My life experience tells me that when you don’t find blacks, when you don’t find women in the sciences, I know that these forces are real, and I had to survive them in order to get where I am today.

So before we start talking about genetic differences, you gotta come up with a system where there’s equal opportunity, then we can have that conversation.

Neil DeGrasse Tyson in response to a question posed by Lawrence Summers, former Treasury Security and Harvard University President

"What’s up with chicks and science?"

"Are there genetic differences between men and women? Explain why more men are in science."

(via we-are-star-stuff)

(Source: magnius159, via we-are-star-stuff)

Filed under neil degrasse tyson sexism racism discrimination science society